• July 1 - Taxes make headlines as larger U.S. internet retailers begin collecting taxes on all purchases; some U.S. states tax internet bandwidth; and the E.U. requires all internet companies to collect value added tax (VAT) on digital downloads.

  • July 15, 2002 - So-called "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh pleads guilty to supplying aid to the enemy and to the possession of explosives during the commission of a felony. Lindh agrees to serve 10 years in prison for each of the charges.

  • July 21 - Telecommunications giant WorldCom files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, the largest such filling in United States history.

  • July 27 - A Sukhoi Su-27 fighter crashes at an air show in the Ukraine, killing 78 and injuring more than 100 others. It is the largest air show disaster in history.

  • August 13 - Human Rights Campaign releases the first Corporate Equality Index.

  • September 8 - The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) sues 261 individuals for allegedly distributing copyright music files over peer-to-peer networks.

  • September 3 - The death knell tolls for Napster after a bankruptcy judge rules that a German company cannot buy the assets of the troubled file-swapping giant, prompting Napster CEO Konrad Hilbers to resign and lay off his staff.

  • October 2 - The United States Congress passes a joint resolution on the Iraq disarmament crisis that explicitly authorizes the President to use the Armed Forces of the United States as he determines necessary and appropriate.

  • October 12 - Terrorists detonate massive bombs in two nightclubs in Kuta, Bali, killing 202 and injuring over 300.

  • October 12 - Hundreds of Spain-based web sites take their content offline in protest of a new law that requires all commercial web sites to register with the government.

  • October 23 - Chechen rebels storm a Moscow theater, taking an estimated 900 people hostage. The standoff ends three days later, when Russian troops raid the building. 129 hostages die in the takeover, almost all as a result of the gas used by federal forces to subdue the rebels.

  • October 24 - The Beltway snipers are arrested.

  • November 5 - U.S. election results: The Republican Party maintains control of the House of Representatives and regains control of the Senate.

  • November 8 - The United Nations Security Council unanimously approves a resolution on Iraq, calling for Saddam Hussein to disarm or face "serious consequences."

  • November 16 - A Campaign Against Climate Change march takes place in London, from Lincoln's Inn Fields, past Esso offices to the United States Embassy.

  • November 21 - NATO invites Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia to become members.

  • November 22 - In Nigeria, more than 100 people are killed in an attack aimed at the contestants of the Miss World contest.

  • November 25 - U.S. President George W. Bush signs the Homeland Security Act into law, establishing the Department of Homeland Security. It is the largest U.S. government reorganization since the creation of the Department of Defense in 1947.

  • December 3 - A new U.S. law creates a kids-safe "dot-kids" domain (kids.us), to be implemented in 2003.

  • December 27, 2002 - A suicide truck-bomb attack destroys the headquarters of Chechnya's Moscow-backed government, killing 72 people.

  • January 7, 2003 - The first official Swiss online election takes place in Anières.

  • January 25 - The SQL Slammer worm causes one of the largest and fastest-spreading DDoS attacks ever. Taking roughly 10 minutes to spread worldwide, the worm took down 5 of the 13 DNS root servers, along with tens of thousands of other servers, and impacted a multitude of systems ranging from bank ATM systems to air traffic control to emergency 911 systems. This is followed shortly by the Sobig.F virus and the Blaster (MSBlast) worm.

  • January 30, 2003 - The leaders of Britain, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Hungary, Poland, Denmark, and the Czech Republic release a statement demonstrating support for the United States' plans for an invasion of Iraq.

  • February 1 - The Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrates over Texas upon reentry, killing all seven astronauts onboard.

  • February 5 - U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell addresses the U.N. Security Council on Iraq.

  • February 15 - Global protests against an invasion of Iraq - more than six million people protest in over 600 cities worldwide, the largest war protest to take place before the war occurs.

  • February 26 - An American businessman is admitted to the Viet Nam France Hospital in Hanoi, Viet Nam. World Health Organization doctor Carlo Urbani reports the unusual and highly contagious disease to WHO. Both the businessman and Carlo Urbani die of the disease-later named SARS-in March.

  • March 5 - The Supreme Court of the United States, by a 5-4 margin, upholds California's "three strikes and you're out" law.

  • March 12 - The World Health Organization issues a global alert on SARS.

  • March 13 - The journal Nature reports that 350,000-year-old upright-walking human footprints had been found in Italy.

  • March 15 - Hu Jintao becomes president of the People's Republic of China, replacing Jiang Zemin.

  • March 16 - The largest coordinated worldwide vigil in history begins, as part of the global protests against an attack on Iraq.

  • March 19 - The first American bombs are dropped on Baghdad, Iraq.

  • March 20 - Land troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland invade Iraq. Two days later, the U.S. and the U.K. begin their "shock and awe" campaign with a massive air strike on military targets in Baghdad.

  • March 29 - WHO doctor Carlo Urbani, who first identified SARS, dies of the disease.

  • April 9 - U.S. forces seize control of Baghdad.

  • May 1 - George W. Bush lands on the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln and gives a speech announcing the end of major combat in Iraq.

  • May 12 - A suicide truck-bomb attack kills at least 60 at a government compound in northern Chechnya.

  • May 14 - A female suicide bomber blows up explosives strapped to her waist in a crowd of thousands of Muslim pilgrims, killing at least 18 people in Chechnya.

  • May 26 - A draft of the proposed European constitution is unveiled.

  • June 1 - The People's Republic of China begins filling the reservoir behind the massive Three Gorges Dam, raising the water level near the dam over 100 meters.

  • June 4 - Martha Stewart and her broker are indicted for using privileged investment information and then obstructing a federal investigation. Stewart also resigns as chairperson and chief executive officer of Martha Stewart Living.

  • June 23 - The U.S. Supreme Court upholds affirmative action in university admissions in Grutter v. Bollinger.

  • June 26, 2003 - The U.S. Supreme Court rules sodomy laws unconstitutional in Lawrence v. Texas.

Prizes 2002-2003

  • Nobel Peace Prize: Jimmy Carter, 39th U.S. president "for his decades of untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development."
  • Nobel Prize for Literature: Imre Kertész, Hungarian writer, "for writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history."
  • Booker Prize: Yann Martel, The Life of Pi
  • Orange Prize for Fiction: Ann Patchett, Bel Canto
  • Prix Médicis International: Philip Roth, The Human Stain
  • Pulitzer Prize for Drama: Suzan-Lori Parks, Topdog/Underdog
  • Pulitzer Prize for Fiction: Richard Russo, Empire Falls
  • Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Carl Dennis, Practical Gods

Source for world timeline: www.wikipedia.org. Source for internet timeline: Hobbes' Internet Timeline 7.0

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